6 Key Symptoms of Asthma

The Mayo Clinic defines Asthma as “…a condition in which your airways narrow and swell and produce extra mucus. This can make breathing difficult…” The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports there are 24 million people with Asthma, 6 million of which are children. Over 14 million doctor office visits were related to asthma, and 1.8 million emergency department visits.

6 Symptoms Key to Asthma

1. Wheezing
2. Cough
3. Frequent episodes with difficulty breathing or shortness of
breath, with or without wheezing.
4. Frequent episodes of chest tightness.
5. Symptoms worsen when exposed to respiratory irritants, such as
cigarette smoke, pollen, animal fur, exercise, etc.
6. Symptoms worsen at night.

Asthma is a controllable condition through an action plan. According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the National Asthma Control Initiative the goal of therapy is control by prevention of asthmatic episodes. An action plan allows asthmatics to be healthy, and active, and involves:

a. Following your treatment plan prepared by your medical doctor.
b. Managing environmental triggers.

Knowledge is power!
It is important to be aware anxiety does not cause asthma. Asthma is caused by an inflammation. Asthmatic medications do not cause addiction. Asthmatic medications do not lose their effectiveness over time. Never delay starting treatment to see if the asthma will improve by itself. Always check you have enough medication left in the inhalers, as well as for expired dates. Corticosteroids are safe, and are not the same as anabolic steroids. Watch for asthma triggers such as respiratory irritants (pollutants, second hand smoke, flu, etc.) that can worsen symptoms. Rinse mouth after using inhaled medication. No eating peanut butter.
Daily control is demonstrated by good breathing, no cough or wheeze, being able to have a good night sleep, and the ability to play and exercise. If you have cough, mild wheezing, chest tightness, especially at night use your quick relief medication. If your symptoms are not controlled within 20 minutes or after 2 efforts of quick relief, call your doctor or go to urgent or emergency care. If quick relief medication is required more than 2 times a week, then call your doctor. Do not wait to get emergency help if you are breathing hard and fast, your nose is flaring, your ribs are moving deeply in and out, you have difficulty walking and talking, you have blue lips, fingernails or earlobes. Get the flu vaccine every year.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply